Bridging the Continental Divide

The project produced an electronic edition of a selection of the Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum, the largest anthology of Scottish neo-Latin  poetry ever produced.  The edition features original scans of the entire 1,272 page text, and a full transcription and translation of 11 of the 37 poets featured.

Biography, poems and translations of the poet Henry Anderson
Biography, poems and translations of the poet Henry Anderson

Bridging the Continental Divide was a project funded by the AHRC and based in the School of Humanities at the University of Glasgow between August 2012 and July 2015. The project's main aim was to produce an electronic edition of a selection of the Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum huius aevi illustrium (DPS, Amsterdam, 1637), the largest anthology of Scottish neo-Latin  poetry ever produced, which was edited by the Fife laird Sir John Scot of Scotstarvit and the Aberdonian poet Arthur Johnstone. The resource provides original scans of the entire 1,272 page text, and a full transcription and translation of 11 of the 37 poets featured within it, totalling 335 pages. Each poem features a full critical apparatus detailing all scriptural and philological references cited, historical and social context, and biographical material on each poet. The website is open ended so that the remainder of the text not translated now can be added by scholars in the future. This resource will allow scholars to understand more fully when and why Latin was used in Jacobean Scotland, and how it interacted with the Protestant culture that dominated early modern Scottish society.

Poems can be browsed in the order in which they appear in the DPS on the poets page, while those looking for the use of specific Latin terms, phrases or authors in the texts, or interested in seeing if the poets discuss specific historical events or figures, can look for these using the search page. Each poem has a short introduction explaining its context (where known) and providing any information about original publication and/or delivery; the recipient or dedicatee, if the poem is addressed to or about a place or person; and the major themes and issues discussed. Page numbers in the original text are given in square brackets in both the Latin text and the English translation, with a thumbnail of the original page which links to a full-size image.

Project website: https://www.dps.gla.ac.uk


Main contact: Steven Reid

Developer: Graeme Cannon

Start year: 2012

End year: 2015

Funded by: AHRC

Subject areas: HistoryInformation Studies

Keywords: Digital EditionDigitisationHistoryTranscriptionXML

Record last updated 2020-01-13