Week Beginning 8th January 2024

This was my first week back after the Christmas holidays and after catching up with emails I spent the best part of two days fixing the content management system of one of the resources that had been migrated during the end of last year.   The Saints Places resource (https://saintsplaces.gla.ac.uk/) is not one I created but I’ve taken on responsibility for it due to my involvement with other place-names resources.  The front-end was migrated by Luca and was working perfectly, but he hadn’t touched the CMS, which is understandable given that the project launched more than ten years ago.  However, I was contacted during the holidays by one of the project team who said that the resource is still regularly updated and therefore I needed to get the CMS up and running again.  This required updates to database query calls and session management and it took quite some time to update and test everything.  I also lost an hour or so with a script that was failing to initiate a session, even though the session start code looked identical to other scripts that worked.  It turned out that this was due to the character encoding of the script, which had been set to UTF-8 BOM, which meant that hidden characters were being outputted to the browser by PHP before the session was instantiated, which then made the session fail.  Thankfully once I realised this it was straightforward to convert the script from UTF-8 BOM to regular UTF-8, which solved the problem.

With this unexpected task out of the way I then returned to my work on the new map interface for the Place-names of Iona project, working through the ‘to do’ list I’d created after our last project meeting just before Christmas.  I updated the map legend filter list to add in a ‘select all’ option.  This took some time to implement but I think it will be really useful.  You can now deselect the ‘select all’ to be left with an empty map, allowing you to start adding in the data you’re interested in rather than having to manually remove all of the uninteresting categories.  You can also reselect ‘select all’ to add everything back in again.

I did a bit of work on the altitude search, making it possible to search for an altitude of zero (either on its own or with a range starting at zero such as ‘0-10’).  This was not previously working as zero was being treated as empty, meaning the search didn’t run.  I’ve also fixed an issue with the display of place-names with a zero altitude – previously these displayed an altitude of ‘nullm’ but they now display ‘0m’.  I also updated the altitude filter groups to make them more fine-grained and updated the colours to make them more varied rather than the shades of green we previously had.  Now 0-24m is a sandy yellow, 25-49, is light green, 50-74m is dark green, 75-99 is brown and anything over 99 is dark grey (currently no matching data).

I also made the satellite view the default map tileset, with the previous default moved to third in the list and labelled ‘Relief’.  This proved to be trickier to update than I thought it would be (e.g. pressing the ‘reset map’ button was still loading the old default even though it shouldn’t have) but I managed to get it sorted.  I also updated the map popups so they have a white background and a blue header to match the look of the full record and removed all references to Landranger maps in the popup as these were not relevant.  Below is a screenshot showing these changes:

I then moved onto the development of the elements glossary, which I completed this week.  This can now be accessed from the ‘Element glossary’ menu item and opens in a pop-up the same as the advanced search and the record.  By default elements across all languages are loaded but you can select a specific language from the drop-down list.  It’s also possible to cite or bookmark a specific view of the glossary, which will load the map with the glossary open at the required place.

I’ve tried to make better use of space than similar pages on the old place-names sites by using three columns.  The place-name elements are links and pressing on one performs a search for the element in question.  I also updated the full record popup to link the elements listed in it to the search results.  I had intended to link to the glossary rather than the search results, which is what happens in the other place-names sites, but I thought it would be more useful and less confusing to link directly to the search results instead.  Below is a screenshot showing the glossary open and displaying elements in Scottish Standard English:

I also think I’ve sorted out the issue with in-record links not working as they should in Chrome and other issues involving bar characters.  I’ve done quite a bit of testing with Chrome and all seems fine to me, but I’ll need to wait an see if other members of the team encounter any issues.  I also added in the ‘translation’ field to the popup and full record, although there are only a few records that currently have this field populated, relabelled the historical OS maps and fixed a bug in the CMS that was resulting in multiple ampersands being generated when an ampersand was used in certain fields.

My final update for the project this week was to change the historical forms in the full record to hide the source information by default.  You now need to press a ‘show sources’ checkbox above the historical forms to turn these on.  I think having the sources turned off really helps to make the historical forms easier to understand.

I also spent a bit of time this week on the Books and Borrowing project, including participating in a project team Zoom call on Monday.  I had thought that we’d be ready for a final cache generation and the launch of the full website this week, but the team are still making final tweaks to the data and this had therefore been pushed back to Wednesday next week.  But this week I updated the ‘genre through time’ visualisation as it turned out that the query that returned the number of borrowing records per genre per year wasn’t quite right and this was giving somewhat inflated figures, which I managed to resolve.  I also created records for the first volume of the Leighton Library Minute Books.  There will be three such volumes in total, all of which will feature digitised images only (no transcriptions).  I processed the images and generated page records for the first volume and will tackle the other two once the images are ready.

Also this week I made a few visual tweaks to the Erskine project website (https://erskine.glasgow.ac.uk/) and I fixed a misplaced map marker in the Place-names of Berwickshire resource (https://berwickshire-placenames.glasgow.ac.uk/).  For some reason the longitude was incorrect for the place-name, even though the latitude was fine, which resulted in the marker displaying in Wales.  I also fixed a couple of issues with the Old English Thesaurus for Jane Roberts and responded to a query from Jennifer Smith regarding the Speak For Yersel resource.

Finally, I investigated an issue with the Anglo-Norman Dictionary.  An entry was displaying what appeared to be an erroneous first date so I investigated what was going on.  The earliest date for the entry was being generated from this attestation:

<attestation id="C-e055cdb1"><dateInfo>

<text_date post="1390" pre="1314" cert="">1390-1412</text_date>

<ms_date post="1400" pre="1449" cert="">s.xv<sup>1</sup></ms_date>

</dateInfo>

<quotation>luy donantz aussi congié et eleccion d’estudier en divinitee ou en loy canoun a son plesir, et ce le plus favorablement a cause de nous</quotation>

<reference><source siglum="Lett_and_Pet" target=""><loc>412.19</loc></source></reference>

</attestation>

Specifically the text date:

<text_date post="1390" pre="1314" cert="">1390-1412</text_date>

This particular attestation was being picked as the earliest due to a typo in the ‘pre’ date which is 1314 when it should be 1412.  Where there is a range of dates the code generates a single year at the midpoint that is used as a hidden first date for ordering purposes (this was agreed upon back when we were first adding in first dates of attestation).  The code to do this subtracts the ‘post’ date from the ‘pre’ date, divides this in two and then adds it to the ‘post’ date, which finds the middle point.  With the typo the code therefore subtracts 1390 from 1314, giving -76.  This is divided in two giving -38.  This is then added onto the ‘post’ date of 1390, which gives 1352.  1352 is the earliest date for any of the entry’s attestations and therefore the earliest display date is set to ‘1390-1412’.  Fixing the typo in the XML and processing the file would therefore rectify the issue.