Week Beginning 20th June 2022

I completed an initial version of the Chambers Library map for the Books and Borrowing project this week.  It took quite a lot of time and effort to implement the subscription period range slider.  Searching for a range when the data also has a range of dates rather than a single date means we needed to make a decision about what data gets returned and what doesn’t.  This is because the two ranges (the one chosen as a filter by the user and the one denoting the start and end periods of subscription for each borrower) can overlap in many different ways.  For example, the period chosen by the user is 05 1828 to 06 1829.  Which of the following borrowers should therefore be returned?

  1. Borrowers range is 06 1828 to 02 1829: Borrower’s range is fully within the period so should definitely be included
  2. Borrowers range is 01 1828 to 07 1828: Borrower’s range extends beyond the selected period at the start and ends within the selected period.  Presumably should be included.
  3. Borrowers range is 01 1828 to 09 1829: Borrower’s range extends beyond the selected period in both directions.  Presumably should be included.
  4. Borrowers range is 05 1829 to 09 1829: Borrower’s range begins during the selected period and ends beyond the selected period. Presumably should be included.
  5. Borrowers range is 01 1828 to 04 1828: Borrower’s range is entirely before the selected period. Should not be included
  6. Borrowers range is 07 1829 to 10 1829: Borrower’s range is entirely after the selected period. Should not be included.

Basically if there is any overlap between the selected period and the borrower’s subscription period the borrower will be returned.  But this means most borrowers will always be returned a lot of the time.  It’s a very different sort of filter to one that purely focuses on a single date – e.g. filtering the data to only those borrowers whose subscription periods *begins* between 05 1828 and 06 1829.

Based on the above assumptions I began to write the logic that would decide which borrowers to include when the range slider is altered.  It was further complicated by having to deal with months as well as years.  Here’s the logic in full if you fancy getting a headache:

if(((mapData[i].sYear>startYear || (mapData[i].sYear==startYear && mapData[i].sMonth>=startMonth)) && ((mapData[i].eYear==endYear && mapData[i].eMonth <=endMonth) || mapData[i].eYear<endYear)) || ((mapData[i].sYear<startYear ||(mapData[i].sYear==startYear && mapData[i].sMonth<=startMonth)) && ((mapData[i].eYear==endYear && mapData[i].eMonth >=endMonth) || mapData[i].eYear>endYear)) || ((mapData[i].sYear==startYear && mapData[i].sMonth<=startMonth || mapData[i].sYear>startYear) && ((mapData[i].eYear==endYear && mapData[i].eMonth <=endMonth) || mapData[i].eYear<endYear) && ((mapData[i].eYear==startYear && mapData[i].eMonth >=startMonth) || mapData[i].eYear>startYear)) || (((mapData[i].sYear==startYear && mapData[i].sMonth>=startMonth) || mapData[i].sYear>startYear) && ((mapData[i].sYear==endYear && mapData[i].sMonth <=endMonth) || mapData[i].sYear<endYear) && ((mapData[i].eYear==endYear && mapData[i].eMonth >=endMonth) || mapData[i].eYear>endYear)) || ((mapData[i].sYear<startYear ||(mapData[i].sYear==startYear && mapData[i].sMonth<=startMonth)) && ((mapData[i].eYear==startYear && mapData[i].eMonth >=startMonth) || mapData[i].eYear>startYear)))

I also added the subscription period to the popups.  The only downside to the range slider is that the occupation marker colours change depending on how many occupations are present during a period, so you can’t always tell an occupation by its colour. I might see if I can fix the colours in place, but it might not be possible.

I also noticed that the jQuery UI sliders weren’t working very well on touchscreens so installed the jQuery TouchPunch library to fix that (https://github.com/furf/jquery-ui-touch-punch).  I also made the library marker bigger and gave it a white border to more easily differentiate it from the borrower markers.

I then moved onto incorporating page images in the resource too.  Where a borrower has borrower records the relevant pages where these borrowing records are found now appear as thumbnails in the borrower popup.  These are generated by the IIIF server based on dimensions passed to it, which is much nicer than having to generate and store thumbnails directly.  I also updated the popup to make it wider when required to give more space for the thumbnails.  Here’s a screenshot of the new thumbnails in action:

Clicking on a thumbnail opens a further popup containing a zoomable / pannable image of the page.  This proved to be rather tricky to implement.  Initially I was going to open a popup in the page (outside of the map container) using a jQuery UI Dialog.  However, I realised that this wouldn’t work when the map was being viewed in full-screen mode, as nothing beyond the map container is visible in such circumstances.  I then considered opening the image in the borrower popup but this wasn’t really big enough.  I then wondered about extending the ‘Map options’ section and replacing the contents of this with the image, but this then caused issues for the contents of the ‘Map options’ section, which didn’t reinitialise properly when the contents were reinstated.  I then found a plugin for the Leaflet mapping library that provides a popup within the map interface (https://github.com/w8r/Leaflet.Modal) and decided to use this.  However, it’s all a little complex as the popup then has to include another mapping library called OpenLayers that enables the zooming and panning of the page image, all within the framework of the overall interactive map.  It is all working and I think it works pretty well, although I guess the map interface is a little cluttered, what with the ‘Map Options’ section, the map legend, the borrower popup and then the page image popup as well.  Here’s a screenshot with the page image open:

All that’s left to do now is add in the introductory text once Alex has prepared it and then make the map live.  We might need to rearrange the site’s menu to add in a link to the Chambers Map as it’s already a bit cluttered.

Also for the project I downloaded images for two further library registers for St Andrews that had previously been missed.  However, there are already records for the registers and pages in the CMS so we’re going to have to figure out a way to work out which image corresponds to which page in the CMS.  One register has a different number of pages in the CMS compared to the image files so we need to work out how to align the start and end and if there are any gaps or issues in the middle.  The other register is more complicated because the images are double pages whereas it looks like the page records in the CMS are for individual pages.  I’m not sure how best to handle this.  I could either try and batch process the images to chop them up or batch process the page records to join them together.  I’ll need to discuss this further with Gerry, who is dealing with the data for St Andrews.

Also this week I prepared for and gave a talk to a group of students from Michigan State University who were learning about digital humanities.  I talked to them for about an hour about a number of projects, such as the Burns Supper map (https://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/supper-map/), the digital edition I’d created for New Modernist Editing (https://nme-digital-ode.glasgow.ac.uk/), the Historical Thesaurus (https://ht.ac.uk/), Books and Borrowing (https://borrowing.stir.ac.uk/) and TheGlasgowStory (https://theglasgowstory.com/).  It went pretty and it was nice to be able to talk about some of the projects I’ve been involved with for a change.

I also made some further tweaks to the Gentle Shepherd Performances page which is now ready to launch, and helped Geert out with a few changes to the WordPress pages of the Anglo-Norman Dictionary.  I also made a few tweaks to the WordPress pages of the DSL website and finally managed to get a hotel room booked for the DHC conference in Sheffield in September.  I also made a couple of changes to the new Gaelic Tongues section of the Seeing Speech website and had a discussion with Eleanor about the filters for Speech Star.  Fraser had been in touch with about 500 Historical Thesaurus categories that had been newly matched to OED categories so I created a little script to add these connections to the online database.

I also had a Zoom call with the Speak For Yersel team.  They had been testing out the resource at secondary schools in the North East and have come away with lots of suggested changes to the content and structure of the resource.  We discussed all of these and agreed that I would work on implementing the changes the week after next.

Next week I’m going to be on holiday, which I have to say I’m quite looking forward to.

Week Beginning 13th June 2022

I worked for several different projects this week.  For the Books and Borrowing project I processed and imported a further register for the Advocates library that had been digitised by the NLS.  I also continued with the interactive map of Chambers library borrowers, although I couldn’t spend as much time on this as I’d hoped as my access to Stirling University’s VPN had stopped working and without VPN access I can’t connect to the database and the project server.  It took a while to resolve the issue as access needs to be approved by some manager or other, but once it was sorted I got to work on some updates.

One thing I’d noticed last week was that when zooming and panning the historical map layer was throwing out hundreds of 403 Forbidden errors to the browser console.  This was not having any impact on the user experience, but was still a bit messy and I wanted to get to the bottom of the issue.  I had a very helpful (as always) chat with Chris Fleet at NLS Maps, who provided the historical map layer and he reckoned it was because the historical map only covers a certain area and moving beyond this was still sending requests for map tiles that didn’t exist.  Thankfully an option exists in Leaflet that allows you to set the boundaries for a map layer (https://leafletjs.com/reference.html#latlngbounds) and I updated the code to do just that, which seems to have stopped the errors.

I then returned to the occupations categorisation, which was including far too many options.  I therefore streamlined the occupations, displaying the top-level occupation only.  I think this works a lot better (although I need to change the icon colour for ‘unknown’).  Full occupation information is still available for each borrower via the popup.

I also had to change the range slider for opacity as standard HTML range sliders don’t allow for double-ended ranges.  We require a double-ended range for the subscription period and I didn’t want to have two range sliders that looked different on one page.  I therefore switched to a range slider offered by the jQuery UI interface library (https://jqueryui.com/slider/#range).  The opacity slider still works as before, it just looks a little different.  Actually, it works better than before, as the opacity now changes as you slide rather than only updating after you mouse-up.

I then began to implement the subscription period slider.  This does not yet update the data.  It’s been pretty tricky to implement this.  The range needs to be dynamically generated based on the earliest and latest dates in the data, and dates are both year and month, which need to be converted into plain integers for the slider and then reinterpreted as years and months when the user updates the end positions.  I think I’ve got this working as it should, though.  When you update the ends of the slider the text above that lists the months and years updates to reflect this.  The next step will be to actually filter the data based on the chosen period.  Here’s a screenshot of the map featuring data categorised by the new streamlined occupations and the new sliders displayed:

For the Speak For Yersel project I made a number of tweaks to the resource, which Jennifer and Mary are piloting with school children in the North East this week.  I added in a new grammatical question and seven grammatical quiz questions.  I tweaked the homepage text and updated the structure of questions 27-29 of the ‘sound about right’ activity.  I ensured that ‘Dumfries’ always appears as ‘Dumfries and Galloway’ in the ‘clever’ activity and follow-on and updated the ‘clever’ activity to remove the stereotype questions.  These were the ones where users had to rate the speakers from a region without first listening to any audio clips and Jennifer reckoned these were taking too long to complete.  I also updated the ‘clever’ follow-on to hide the stereotype options and switched the order of the listener and speaker options in the other follow-on activity for this type.

For the Speech Star project I replaced the data for the child speech error database with a new, expanded dataset and added in ‘Speaker Code’ as a filter option.  I also replicated the child speech and normalised speech databases from the clinical website we’re creating on the more academic teaching site we’re creating and also pulled in the IPA chart from Seeing Speech into this resource too.  Here’s a screenshot of how the child speech error database looks with the new ‘speaker code’ filter with ‘vowel disorder’ selected:

I also responded to Craig Lamont in Scottish literature with some further feedback on the structure of his Burns Manuscript Database spreadsheet, which is now shaping up nicely.  Craig had also sent me an updated spreadsheet with data for the Ramsay Gentle Shepherd performances project.  I’d set this up (interactive map, timeline and filterable tabular data) a few weeks ago, migrating it to the University’s T4 website management system.  All had worked then but when I logged into T4 and previewed the page I previously created I discovered it longer worked.  The page hadn’t been updated since the end of May and I had no idea what’s gone wrong.  I can only assume that the linked content (i.e. the links to the JavaScript files) had somehow become unlinked.  I decided, therefore, that it would be easier to just host the JavaScript files on another server I have direct access to rather than having to shoehorn it all into T4.  I made an updated version with the new dataset and this is working well.

I also made a couple of tweaks to the DSL this week, installing the TablePress plugin for the ancillary pages and creating a further alternative logo for the DSL’s Facebook posts.  I also returned to going some work for the Anglo-Norman Dictionary, offering some advice to the editor Geert about incorporating publications and overhauling how cross references are displayed in the Dictionary Management System.

I updated the ‘View Entry’ page in the DMS.  Previously it only included cross references FROM the entry you’re looking at TO any other entries.  I.e. it only displayed content when the entry was of type ‘xref’ rather than ‘main’.  Now in addition to this there’s a further section listing all cross references TO the entry you’re looking at from any entry of type ‘xref’ that links to it.

In addition there is a button allowing you to view all entries that include a cross reference to the current entry anywhere in their XML – i.e. where an <xref> tag that features the current entry’s slug is found at any level in any other main entry’s XML.  This code is hugely memory intensive to run, as basically all 27,464 main entries need to be pulled into the script, with the full XML contents of each checked for matching xrefs.  For this reason the page doesn’t run the code each time the ‘view entry’ page is loaded but instead only runs when you actively press the button.  It takes a few seconds for the script to process, but after it does the cross references are listed in the same manner as the ‘pure’ xrefs in the preceding sections.

Finally I participated in a Zoom-based focus group for the AHRC about the role of technicians in research projects this week.  It was great to participate to share my views on my role and to hear from other people with similar roles at other organisations.

Week Beginning 6th June 2022

I’d taken Monday off this week to have an extra-long weekend following the jubilee holidays on Thursday and Friday last week.  On Tuesday I returned to another meeting for Speak For Yersel and a list of further tweaks to the site, including many changes to three of the five activities and a new set of colours for the map marker icons, which make the markers much more easy to differentiate.

I spent most of the week working on the Books and Borrowing project.  We’d been sent a new library register from the NLS and I spent a bit of time downloading the 700 or so images, processing them and uploading them into our system.  As usual, page numbers go a bit weird.  Page 632 is written as 634 and then after page 669 comes not 670 but 700!  I ran my script to bring the page numbers in the system into line with the oddities of the written numbers.  On Friday I downloaded a further library register which I’ll need to process next week.

My main focus for the project was the Chambers Library interactive map sub-site.  The map features the John Ainslie 1804 map from the NLS, and currently it uses the same modern map as I’ve used elsewhere in the front-end for consistency, although this may change.  The map defaults to having a ‘Map options’ pane open on the left, and you can open and close this using the button above it.  I also added a ‘Full screen’ button beneath the zoom buttons in the bottom right.  I also added this to the other maps in the front-end too. Borrower markers have a ‘person’ icon and the library itself has the ‘open book’ icon as found on other maps.

By default the data is categorised by borrower gender, with somewhat stereotypical (but possibly helpful) blue and pink colours differentiating the two.  There is one borrower with an ‘unknown’ gender and this is set to green.  The map legend in the top right allows you to turn on and off specific data groups.  The screenshot below shows this categorisation:

The next categorisation option is occupation, and this has some problems.  The first is there are almost 30 different occupations, meaning the legend is awfully long and so many different marker colours are needed that some of them are difficult to differentiate.  Secondly, most occupations only have a handful of people.  Thirdly, some people have multiple occupations, and if so these are treated as one long occupation, so we have both ‘Independent Means > Gentleman’ and then ‘Independent Means > Gentleman, Politics/Office Holders > MP (Britain)’.  It would be tricky to separate these out as the marker would then need to belong to two sets with two colours, plus what happens if you hide one set?  I wonder if we should just use the top-level categorisation for the groupings instead?  This would result in 12 groupings plus ‘unknown’, meaning the legend would be both shorter and narrower.  Below is a screenshot of the occupation categorisation as it currently stands:

The next categorisation is subscription type, which I don’t think needs any explanation.  I then decided to add in a further categorisation for number of borrowings, which wasn’t originally discussed but as I used the page I found myself looking for an option to see who borrowed the most, or didn’t borrow anything.  I added the following groupings, but these may change: 0, 1-10, 11-20, 21-50, 51-70, 70+ and have used a sequential colour scale (darker = more borrowings).  We might want to tweak this, though, as some of the colours are a bit too similar.  I haven’t added in the filter to select subscription period yet, but will look into this next week.

At the bottom of the map options is a facility to change the opacity of the historical map so you can see the modern street layout.  This is handy for example for figuring out why there is a cluster of markers in a field where ‘Ainslie Place’ was presumably built after the historical map was produced.

I decided to not include the marker clustering option in this map for now as clustering would make it more difficult to analyse the categorisation as markers from multiple groupings would end up clustered together and lose their individual colours until the cluster is split.  Marker hover-overs display the borrower name and the pop-ups contain information about the borrower.  I still need to add in the borrowing period data, and also figure out how best to link out to information about the borrowings or page images.  The Chambers Library pin displays the same information as found in the ‘libraries’ page you’ve previously seen.

Also this week I responded to a couple of queries from the DSL people about Google Analytics and the icons that gets used for the site when posting on Facebook.  Facebook was picking out the University of Glasgow logo rather than the DSL one, which wasn’t ideal.  Apparently there’s a ‘meta’ tag that you need to add to the site header in order for Facebook to pick up the correct logo, as discussed here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7836753/how-to-customize-the-icon-displayed-on-facebook-when-posting-a-url-onto-wall

I also created a new user for the Ayr place-names project and dealt with a couple of minor issues with the CMS that Simon Taylor had encountered.  I also investigated a certificate error with the ohos.ac.uk website and responded to a query about QR codes from fellow developer David Wilson.  Also, Craig Lamont in Scottish Literature got in touch about a spreadsheet listed Burns manuscripts that he’s been working on with a view to turning it into a searchable online resource and I gave him some feedback about the structure of the spreadsheet.

Finally, I did a bit of work for the Historical Thesaurus, working on a further script to match up HT and OED categories based on suggestions by researcher Beth Beattie.  I found a script I’d produced in from 2018 that ran pattern matching on headings and I adapted this to only look at subcats within 02.02 and 02.03, picking out all unmatched OED subcats from these (there are 627) and then finding all unmatched HT categories where our ‘t’ numbers match the OED path.  Previously the script used the HT oedmaincat column to link up OED and HT but this no longer matches (e.g. HT ‘smarten up’ has ‘t’ nums 02.02.16.02 which matches OED 02.02.16.02 ‘to smarten up’ whereas HT ‘oedmaincat’ is ’02.04.05.02’).

The script lists the various pattern matches at the top of the page and the output is displayed in a table that can be copied and pasted into Excel.  Of the 627 OED subcats there are 528 that match an HT category.  However, some of them potentially match multiple HT categories.  These appear in red while one to one matches appear in green.  Some of these multiple matches are due to Levenshtein matches (e.g. ‘sadism’ and ‘sadist’) but most are due to there being multiple subcats at different levels with the exact same heading.  These can be manually tweaked in Excel and then I could run the updated spreadsheet through a script to insert the connections.  We also had an HT team meeting this week that I attended.

Week Beginning 30th May 2022

It was a three-day week as Thursday and Friday were bank holidays for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.  I spent most of the available time working on the Books and Borrowers project.  I had a chat with RA Alex Deans about the data for the Chambers Library sub-project that we’re hoping to launch in July.  Although this data is already in the system it needs additional latitude and longitude data so we can position borrowers on an interactive map.  We decided to add this data and some other data using the ‘additional fields’ system in the CMS and Alex is hopefully going to get this done by next week.

I’d made a start on the API for the project last week, and this week I completed the endpoint that displays all of the data that will be needed for the ‘Browse Libraries’ page, which can be accessed as JSON or CSV data.  This includes counts of registers, borrowing records, books and borrowers plus a breakdown of the number of borrowings per year at each library that will be used for the stacked column chart.  The systems reside on servers at Stirling University, and their setup has the database on a different server to the code.  This means there is an overhead when sending queries to the database as each one needs to be sent as an HTTP request rather than dealt with locally.  This has led me to be a bit more efficient when constructing queries.  For example, rather than running individual ‘count’ queries for each library after running an initial query to retrieve all library details I’ve instead used subqueries as part of the initial query so all the data including the counts gets processed and returned by the database via one HTTP request.

With the data retrieval aspects of the ‘browse libraries’ page completed I then moved on to developing the page itself.  It has an introductory section (with placeholder text for now) then a map showing the locations of the libraries.  Any libraries that currently have lat/lng data appear on this map.  The markers are clustered when zoomed out, with the number referring to the number of libraries in the cluster.  I selected a map design that I thought fitted in with the site, but this might change, and I used an open book icon for the library map marker on a red background (to match the site’s header text colour) and again this may change.  You can hover over a marker to see the library name and press on a marker to open a popup containing a link to the library, the library name and alternative names, location, foundation date, type and statistics about registers, books, borrowers and records.

Beneath the map is a tabular view of the data.  This is the exact same data as is found on the map.  Library names are buttons leading to the library’s page.  You can change the order of the table by pressing on a heading (e.g. to see which library has the most books).  Pressing a second time reverses the order.  Below is a screenshot showing the map and the table, with the table ordered by number of borrowing records:

Beneath the table is a stacked column chart showing borrowings at the libraries over time that I created using the extremely useful HighCharts JavaScript library (See https://www.highcharts.com/demo).  At the moment the borrowing records start somewhere between 1700 and 1710 and end somewhere between 1890 and 1899.  Actually, there are some borrowing records beyond even this but are presumably mistakes (e.g. one had a year of ‘179’ or something like that).  As generating a graph with a bar for each year would result in about 200 bars I decided this wasn’t feasible and instead grouped borrowings into decades.  This sort of works, but we still have many decades at the start and end that only have a few records, but we may limit the decades we focus on.  We’re also visualising the data from 18 libraries in the chart, which is a lot.  This takes up a lot of space under the chart (where you can hover over a name to highlight the data in the bars).  However, you can open the menu to view the chart full screen, which makes it more legible.  You can also view the year data in a table by selecting the ‘data table’ option.  Below is a screenshot of the bar chart:

There are a couple of things I could do to make this more legible if required.  Firstly, we could use a stacked bar chart instead (https://www.highcharts.com/demo/bar-stacked).  The years would then be on the y-axis and we could have a very long chart with all of the years in place rather than aggregating to decades.  This would make it more difficult to view the legend and the x-axis tick marks, as you would need to scroll down to see them.  Secondly, we could stick with the decade view but then give the user the option of selecting a decade to view a new chart featuring the individual years in that decade.  This would make it harder for users to get the big picture all at once, although I guess the decade view would give that.

Also this week I checked up on the Speak For Yersel website, as we had sent the URL out to people with an interest in the Scots language at the end of last week.  When I checked on Wednesday we’d had 168 registered users.  These users had submitted 8,110 answers for the main questions plus 85 for the ‘drag onto map’ and 85 for the transcript.  606 of those main answers are from people who have chosen ‘outside Scotland’.  I also realised that I’d set the markers to be smaller if there were more than 100 answers on a map but the markers looked too small so I’ve updated things to make them the same size no matter how many answers there are.

My other main task for the week was to finalise the transfer of the Uist Saints website.  We managed to get the domain name ownership transferred over to Glasgow and paid the subscription fee for the next nine years and the version of the site hosted at Glasgow can now be found here: https://uistsaints.co.uk/