Week Beginning 12th September 2022

I spent a bit of time this week going through my notes from the Digital Humanities Congress last week and writing last week’s lengthy post.  I also had my PDR session on Friday and I needed to spend some time preparing for this, writing all of the necessary text and then attending the session.  It was all very positive and it was a good opportunity to talk to my line manager about my role.  I’ve been in this job for ten years this month and have been writing these blog posts every working week for those ten years, which I think is quite an achievement.

In terms of actual work on projects, it was rather a bitty week, with my time spread across lots of different projects.  On Monday I had a Zoom call for the VariCS project, a phonetics project in collaboration with Strathclyde that I’m involved with.  The project is just starting up and this was the first time the team had all met.  We mainly discussed setting up a web presence for the project and I gave some advice on how we could set up the website, the URL and such things.  In the coming weeks I’ll probably get something set up for the project.

I then moved onto another Burns-related mini-project that I worked on with Kirsteen McCue many months ago – a digital edition of Koželuch’s settings of Robert Burns’s Songs for George Thomson.  We’re almost ready to launch this now and this week I created a page for an introductory essay, migrated a Word document to WordPress to fill the page, including adding in links and tweaking the layout to ensure things like quotes displayed properly.  There are still some further tweaks that I’ll need to implement next week, but we’re almost there.

I also spent some time tweaking the Speak For Yersel website, which is now publicly accessible (https://speakforyersel.ac.uk/) but still not quite finished.  I created a page for a video tour of the resource and made a few tweaks to the layout, such as checking the consistency of font sizes used throughout the site.  I also made some updates to the site text and added in some lengthy static content to the site in the form or a teachers’ FAQ and a ‘more information’ page.  I also changed the order of some of the buttons shown after a survey is completed to hopefully make it clearer that other surveys are available.

I also did a bit of work for the Speech Star project.  There had been some issues with the Central Scottish Phonetic Features MP4s playing audio only on some operating systems and the replacements that Eleanor had generated worked for her but not for me.  I therefore tried uploading them to and re-downloading them from YouTube, which thankfully seemed to fix the issue for everyone.  I then made some tweaks to the interfaces to the two project websites.  For the public site I made some updates to ensure the interface looked better on narrow screens, ensuring changing the appearance of the ‘menu’ button and making the logo and site header font smaller to they take up less space.  I also added an introductory video to the homepage too.

For the Books and Borrowing project I processed the images for another library register.  This didn’t go entirely smoothly.  I had been sent 73 images and these were all upside down so needed rotating.  It then transpired that I should have been sent 273 images so needed to chase up the missing ones.  Once I’d been sent the full set I was then able to generate the page images for the register, upload the images and associate them with the records.

I then moved on to setting up the front-end for the Ayr Place-names website.  In the process of doing so I became aware that one of the NLS map layers that all of our place-name projects use had stopped working.  It turned out that the NLS had migrated this map layer to a third party map tile service (https://www.maptiler.com/nls/) and the old URLs these sites were still using no longer worked.  I had a very helpful chat with Chris Fleet at NLS Maps about this and he explained the situation.  I was able to set up a free account with the maptiler service and update the URLS in four place-names websites that referenced the layer (https://berwickshire-placenames.glasgow.ac.uk/, https://kcb-placenames.glasgow.ac.uk/, https://ayr-placenames.glasgow.ac.uk and https://comparative-kingship.glasgow.ac.uk/scotland/).  I’ll need to ensure this is also done for the two further place-names projects that are still in development (https://mull-ulva-placenames.glasgow.ac.uk and https://iona-placenames.glasgow.ac.uk/).

I managed to complete the work on the front-end for the Ayr project, which was mostly straightforward as it was just adapting what I’d previously developed for other projects.  The thing that took the longest was getting the parish data and the locations where the parish three-letter acronyms should appear, but I was able to get this working thanks to the notes I’d made the last time I needed to deal with parish boundaries (as documented here: https://digital-humanities.glasgow.ac.uk/2021-07-05/.  After discussions with Thomas Clancy about the front-end I decided that it would be a good idea to redevelop the map-based interface to display al of the data on the map by default and to incorporate all of the search and browse options within the map itself.  This would be a big change, and it’s one I had been thinking of implementing anyway for the Iona project, but I’ll try and find some time to work on this for all of the place-name sites over the coming months.

Finally, I had a chat with Kirsteen McCue and Luca Guariento about the BOSLIT project.  This project is taking the existing data for the Bibliography of Scottish Literature in Translation (available on the NLS website here: https://data.nls.uk/data/metadata-collections/boslit/) and creating a new resource from it, including visualisations.  I offered to help out with this and will be meeting with Luca to discuss things further, probably next week.