Week Beginning 16th May 2022

This week I finished off all of the outstanding work for the Speak For Yerself project. The other members of the team (Jennifer and Mary) are both on holiday so I finished off all of the tasks I had on my ‘to do’ list, although there will certainly be more to do once they are both back at work again.  The tasks I completed were a mixture of small tweaks and larger implementations.  I made tweaks to the ‘About’ page text and changed the intro text to the ‘more give your word’ exercise.  I then updated the age maps for this exercise, which proved to be pretty tricky and time-consuming to implement as I needed to pull apart a lot of the existing code.  Previously these maps showed ‘60+’ and ‘under 19’ data for a question, with different colour markers for each age group showing those who would say a term (e.g. ‘Scunnered’) and grey markers for each age group showing those who didn’t say the term.  We have completely changed the approach now.  The maps now default to showing ‘under 19’ data only, with different colours for each different term.  There is now an option in the map legend to switch to viewing the ‘60+’ data instead.  I added in the text ‘press to view’ to try and make it clearer that you can change the map.  Here’s a screenshot:

I also updated the ‘give your word’ follow-on questions so that they are now rated in a new final page that works the same way as the main quiz.  In the main ‘give your word’ exercise I updated the quiz intro text and I ensured that the ‘darker dots’ explanatory text has now been removed for all maps.  I tweaked a few questions to change their text or the number of answers that are selectable and I changed the ‘sounds about right’ follow-on ‘rule’ text and made all of the ‘rule’ words lower case.  I also made it so that when the user presses ‘check answers’ for this exercise a score is displayed to the right and the user is able to proceed directly to the next section without having to correct their answers.  They still can correct their answers if they want.

I then made some changes to the ‘She sounds really clever’ follow-on.  The index for this is now split into two sections, one for ‘stereotype’ data and one for ‘rating speaker’ data and you can view the speaker and speaker/listener results for both types of data.  I added in the option of having different explanatory text for each of the four perception pages (or maybe just two – one for stereotype data, one for speaker ratings) and when viewing the speaker rating data the speaker sound clips now appear beneath the map.  When viewing the speaker rating data the titles above the sliders are slightly different.  Currently when selecting the ‘speaker’ view the title is “This speaker from X sounds…” as opposed to “People from X sound…”.  When selecting the ‘speaker/listener’ view the title is “People from Y think this speaker from X sounds…” as opposed to “People from Y think people from X sound…”.  I also added a ‘back’ button to these perception follow-on pages so it’s easier to choose a different page.  Finally, I added some missing HTML <title> tags to pages (e.g. ‘Register’ and ‘Privacy’) and fixed a bug whereby the ‘explore more’ map sound clips weren’t working.

With my ‘Speak For Yersel’ tasks out of the way I could spend some time looking at other projects that I’d put on hold for a while.  A while back Eleanor Lawson contacted me about adding a new section to the Seeing Speech website where Gaelic speaker videos and data will be accessible, and I completed a first version this week.  I replicated the Speech Star layout rather than the /r/ & /l/ page layout as it seemed more suitable: the latter only really works for a limited number of records while the former works well with lots more (there are about 150 Gaelic records).  What this means is the data has a tabular layout and filter options.  As with Speech Star you can apply multiple filters and you can order the table by a column by clicking on its header (clicking a second time reverses the order).  I’ve also included the option to open multiple videos in the same window.  I haven’t included the playback speed options as the videos already include the clip at different speeds.  Here’s a screenshot of how the feature looks:

On Thursday I had a Zoom call with Laura Rattray and Ailsa Boyd to discuss a new digital edition project they are in the process of planning.  We had a really great meeting and their project has a lot of potential.  I’ve offered to give technical advice and write any technical aspects of the proposal as and when required, and their plan is to submit the proposal in the autumn.

My final major task for the week was to continue to work on the Ramsay ‘Gentle Shepherd’ data.  I overhauled the filter options that I implemented last week so they work in a less confusing way when multiple types are selected now.  I’ve also imported the updated spreadsheet, taking the opportunity to trim whitespace to cut down on strange duplicates in the filter options.  There are some typos you’ll need to fix in the spreadsheet, though (e.g. we have ‘Glagsgow’ and ‘Glagsow’) plus some dates still need to be fixed.

I then created an interactive map for the project and have incorporated the data for which there are latitude and longitude values.  As with the Edinburgh Gazetteer map of reform societies (https://edinburghgazetteer.glasgow.ac.uk/map-of-reform-societies/) the number of performances at a venue is displayed in the map marker.  Hover over a marker to see info about the venue.  Click on it to open a list of performances.  Note that when zoomed out it can be difficult to make out individual markers but we can’t really use clustering as on the Burns Supper map (https://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/supper-map/) because this would get confusing:  we’d have clustered numbers representing the number of markers in a cluster and then induvial markers with a number representing the number of performances.  I guess we could remove the number of performances from the marker and just have this in the tooltip and / or popup, but it is quite useful to see all the numbers on the map.  Here’s a screenshot of how the map currently looks:

I still need to migrate all of this to the University’s T4 system, which I aim to tackle next week.

Also this week I had discussions about migrating an externally hosted project website to Glasgow for Thomas Clancy.  I received a copy of the files and database for the website and have checked over things and all is looking good.  I also submitted a request for a temporary domain and I should be able to get a version of the site up and running next week.  I also regenerated a list of possible duplicate authors in the Books and Borrowing system after the team had carried out some work to remove duplicates.  I will be able to use the spreadsheet I have now to amalgamate duplicate authors, a task which I will tackle next week.