Week Beginning 14th March 2022

With the help of Raymond at Arts IT Support we migrated the test version of the DSL website to the new server this week, and also set up the Solr free-text indexes for the new DSL data too.  This test version of the site will become the live version when we’re ready to launch it in April and the migration all went pretty smoothly, although I did encounter an error with the htaccess script that processed URLs for dictionary pages due to underscores not needing to be escaped on the old server but requiring a backslash as an escape character on the new server.

I also replaced the test version’s WordPress database with a copy of the live site’s WordPress database, plus copied over some of the customisations from the live site such as changes to logos and the content of the header and the footer, bringing the test version’s ancillary content and design into alignment with the live site whilst retaining some of the additional tweaks I’d made to the test site (e.g. the option to hide the ‘browse’ column and the ‘about this entry’ box).

One change to the structure of the DSL data that has been implemented is that dates are now machine readable, with ‘from’, ‘to’ and ‘prefix’ attributes.  I had started to look at extracting these for use in the site (e.g. maybe displaying the earliest citation date alongside the headword in the ‘browse’ lists) when I spotted an issue with the data:  Rather than having a date in the ‘to’ attribute, some entries had an error code – for example there are 6,278 entries that feature a date with ‘PROBLEM6’ as a ‘to’ attribute.  I flagged this up with the DSL people and after some investigation they figured out that the date processing script wasn’t expecting to find a circa in a date ending a range (e.g. c1500-c1512).  When the script encountered such a case it was giving an error instead.  The DSL people were able to fix this issue and a new data export was prepared, although I won’t be using it just yet, as they will be sending me a further update before we go live and to save time I decided to just wait until they send this on.  I also completed work on the XSLT for displaying bibliography entries and created a new ‘versions and changes’ page, linking to it from a statement in the footer that notes the data version number.

For the ‘Speak For Yersel’ project I made a number of requested updates to the exercises that I’d previously created.  I added a border around the selected answer and ensured the active state of a selected button doesn’t stay active and I added handy ‘skip to quiz’ and ‘skip to explore’ links underneath the grammar and lexical quizzes so we don’t have to click through all those questions to check out the other parts of the exercise.  I italicised ‘you’ and ‘others’ on the activity index pages and I fixed a couple of bugs on the grammar questionnaire.  Previously only the map rolled up and an issue was caused when an answer was pressed on whilst the map was still animating.  Now the entire question area animates so it’s impossible to press on an answer when the map isn’t available.  I updated the quiz questions so they now have the same layout as the questionnaire, with options on the left and the map on the right and I made all maps taller to see how this works.

For the ‘Who says what where’ exercise the full sentence text is now included and I made the page scroll to the top of the map if this isn’t visible when you press on an item.  I also updated the map and rating colours, although there is still just one placeholder map that loads so the lexical quiz with its many possible options doesn’t have its own map that represents this.  The map still needs some work – e.g. adding in a legend and popups.  I also made all requested changes to the lexical question wording and made the ‘v4’ click activity the only version, making it accessible via the activities menu and updated the colours for the correct and incorrect click answers.

For the Books and Borrowing project I completed a first version of the requirements for the public website, which has taken a lot of time and a lot of thought to put together, resulting in a document that’s more than 5,000 words long.  On Friday I had a meeting with PI Katie and Co-I Matt to discuss the document.  We spent an hour going through it and a list of questions I’d compiled whilst writing it, and I’ll need to make some modifications to the document based on our discussions.  I also downloaded images of more library registers from St Andrews and one further register from Glasgow that I will need to process when I’m back at work too.

I also spent a bit of time writing a script to export a flat CSV version of the Historical Thesaurus, then made some updates based on feedback from the HT team before exporting a further version.  We also spotted that adjectives of ‘parts of insects’ appeared to be missing from the website and I investigated what was going on with it.  It turned out that there was an empty main category missing, and as all the other data was held in subcategories these didn’t appear, as all subcategories need a main category to hang off.  After adding in a maincat all of the data was restored.

Finally, I did a bit of work for the Speech Star project.  Firstly, I fixed a couple of layout issues with the ExtIPA chart symbols.  There was an issue with the diacritics for the symbol that looks like a theta, resulting in them being offset.  I reduced the size of the symbol slightly and have adjusted the margins of the symbols above and below and this seems to have done the trick.  In addition, I did a little bit of research into setting the playback speed and it looks like this will be pretty easy to do whilst still using the default video player.  See this page: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3027707/how-to-change-the-playing-speed-of-videos-in-html5.  I added a speed switcher to the popup as a little test to see how it works.  The design would still need some work (buttons with the active option highlighted) but it’s good to have a proof of concept.  Pressing ‘normal’ or ‘slow’ sets the speed for the current video in the popup and works both when the video is playing and when it’s stopped.

Also, I was sure that jumping to points in the videos wasn’t working before, but it seems to work fine now – you can click and drag the progress bar and the video jumps to the required point, either when playing or paused.  I wonder if there was something in the codec that was previously being used that prevented this.  So fingers cross we’ll be able to just use the standard HTML5 video player to achieve everything the projects requires.

I’ll be participating in the UCU strike action for all of next week so it will be the week beginning the 28th of March before I’m back in work again.