Week Beginning 20th September 2021

This was a four-day week for me as I’d taken Friday off.  I went into my office at the University on Tuesday to have my Performance and Development Review with my line-manager Marc Alexander.  It was the first time I’d been at the University since before the summer and it felt really different to the last time – much busier and more back to normal, with lots of people in the building and a real bustle to the West End.  My PDR session was very positive and it was great to actually meet a colleague in person again – the first time I’d done so since the first lockdown began.  I spent the rest of the day trying to get my office PC up to date after months of inaction.  One of the STELLA apps (the Grammar one) had stopped working on iOS devices, seemingly because it was still a 32-bit app, and I wanted to generate a new version of it.  This meant upgrading MacOS on my dual-boot PC, which I hadn’t used for years and was very out of date.  I’m still not actually sure whether the Mac I’ve got will support a version of MacOS that will allow me to engage in app development, as I need to incrementally upgrade the MacOS version, which takes quite some time, and by the end of the day there were still further updates required.  I’ll need to continue with this another time.

I spent quite a bit of the remainder of the week working on the new ‘Speak for Yersel’ project.  We had a team meeting on Monday and a follow-up meeting on Wednesday with one of the researchers involved in the Manchester Voices project (https://www.manchestervoices.org/) who very helpfully showed us some of the data collection apps they use and some of the maps that they generate.  It gave us a lot to think about, which was great.  I spent some further time looking through other online map examples, such as the New York Times dialect quiz (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/upshot/dialect-quiz-map.html) and researching how we might generate the maps we’d like to see.  It’s going to take quite a bit more research to figure out how all of this is going to work.

Also this week I spoke to the Iona place-names people about how their conference in December might be moved online and fixed a permissions issue with the Imprints of New Modernist Editing website and discussed the domain name for the STAR project with Eleanor Lawson.  I also had a chat with Luca Guariento about the restrictions we have on using technologies on the servers in the College of Arts and how this might be addressed.

I also received a spreadsheet of borrowing records covering five registers for the Books and Borrowing project and went through it to figure out how the data might be integrated with our system.  The biggest issue is figuring out which page each record is on.  In the B&B system each borrowing record must ‘belong’ to a page, which in turn ‘belongs’ to a register.  If a borrowing record has no page it can’t exist in the system.  In this new data only three registers have a ‘Page No.’ column and not every record in these registers has a value in this column.  We’ll need to figure out what can be done about this, because as I say, having a page is mandatory in the B&B system.  We could use the ‘photo’ column as this is present across all registers and every row.  However, I noticed that there are multiple photos per page, e.g. for SL137144 page 2 has 2 photos (4538 and 4539) so photo IDs don’t have a 1:1 relationship with pages.  If we can think of a way to address the page issue then I should be able to import the data.

Finally, I continued to work on the Anglo-Norman Dictionary project, fixing some issues relating to yoghs in the entries and researching a potentially large issue relating to the extraction of earliest citation dates.  Apparently there are a number of cases when the date for a citation that should be used is not the date as coded in the date section of the citation’s XML, but should instead be a date taken from a manuscript containing a variant form within the citation.  The problem is there is no flag to state when this situation occurs, instead it occurs whenever the form of the word in the citation is markedly different within the citation but similar in the variant text.  It seems unlikely that an automated script would be able to ascertain when to use the variant date as there is just so much variation between the forms.  This will need some further investigation, which I hope to be able to do next week.