Week Beginning 30th August 2021

This week I completed work on the proximity search of the Anglo-Norman textbase.  Thankfully the performance issues I’d feared might crop up haven’t occurred at all.  The proximity search allows you to search for term 1 up to 10 words to the left or right of term 2 using ‘after’ or ‘before’.  If you select ‘after or before’ then (as you might expect) the search looks 10 words in each direction.  This ties in nicely with the KWIC display, which displays 10 words either side of your term.  As mentioned last week, unless you search for exact terms (surrounded by double quotes) you’ll reach an intermediary page that lists all possible matching forms for terms 1 and 2.  Select one of each and you can press the ‘Continue’ button to perform the actual search.  What this does is finds all occurrences of term 2 (term 2 is the fixed anchor point, it’s term 1 that can be variable in position), then for each it checks the necessary words before or after (or before and after) the term for the presence of term 1.  When generating the search words I generated and stored the position the word appears on the page, which made it relatively easy to pinpoint nearby words.  What is trickier is dealing with words near the beginning or the end of a page, as in such cases the next or previous page must also then be looked at.  I hadn’t previously generated a total count of the number of words on a page, which was needed to ascertain whether a word was close to the end of the page, so I ran a script that generated and stored the word count for each page.  The search seems to be working as it should for words near the beginning and end of a page.

The results page is displayed in the same way as the regular search, complete with KWIC and sorting options.  Both terms 1 and 2 are bold, and if you sort the results the relevant numbered word left or right of term 2 is highlighted, as with the regular search.  When you click through to the actual text all occurrences of both term 1 and term 2 are highlighted (not just those in close proximity), but the page centres on the part of the text that meets the criteria, so hopefully this isn’t a problem – it is quite useful to see other occurrences of the terms after all.  There are still some tweaks I need to make to the search based on feedback I received during the week, and I’ll look at these next week, but on the whole the search facility (and the textbase facility in general) is just about ready to launch, which is great as it’s the last big publicly facing feature of the AND that I needed to develop.

Also this week I spent some time working on the Books and Borrowing project.  I created a new user account for someone who will be working for the project and I also received the digitised images for another library register, this time from the NLS.  I downloaded these and then uploaded them to the server, associating the images with the page records that were already in the system.  The process was a little more complicated and time consuming than I’d anticipated as the register has several blank pages in it that are not in our records but have been digitised.  Therefore the number of page images didn’t match up with the number of pages, plus page images were getting associated with the wrong page.  I had to manually look through the page images and delete the blanks, but I was still off by one image.  I then had to manually check through the contents of the images to compare them with the transcribed text to see where the missing image should have gone.  Thankfully I managed to track it down and reinstate it (it had one very faint record on it, which I hadn’t noticed when viewing and deleting blank thumbnails).  With that in place all images and page records aligned and I could made the associations in the database.  I also sent Gerry McKeever the zipped up images (several gigabytes) for a couple of the St Andrews registers as he prefers to have the complete set when working on the transcriptions.

I had a meeting with Gerry Carruthers and Pauline McKay this week to discuss further developments of the ‘phase 2’ Burns website, which they are hoping to launch in the new year, and also to discuss the hosting of the Scottish theatre studies journal that Gerry is sorting out.

I spent the rest of the week working on mockups for the two websites for the STAR speech and language therapy project.  Firstly there’s the academic site.  The academics site is going to sit alongside Seeing Speech and Dynamic Dialects, and as such it should have the same interface as these sites.  Therefore I’ve made a site that is pretty much identical in terms of the overall theme.  I added in a new ‘site tab’ for the site that sits at the top of the page and have added in the temporary logo as a site logo and favicon (the latter may need a dark background to make it stand out).  I created menu items for all of the items in Eleanor Lawson’s original mockup image.  These all work – leading to empty pages for now and added the star logo to the ‘Star in-clinic’ menu item as in the mockup too.  In the footer I made a couple of tweaks to the layout – the logos are all centre aligned and have a white border.  I added in the logo for Strathclyde and have only included the ESRC logo, but can add others in if required.  The actual content of the homepage is identical to Seeing Speech for now – I haven’t changed any images or text.

For the clinic website I’ve taken Eleanor’s mockup as a starting point again and have so far made two variations.  I will probably work on at least one more different version (with multiple variations) next week.  I haven’t added in the ‘site tabs’ to either version as I didn’t want to clutter things up, and I’m imagining that there will be a link somewhere to the STAR academic site for those that want it, and from there people would be able to find Seeing Speech and Dynamic Dialects.  The first version of the mockup has a top-level menu bar (we will need such a menu listing the pages the site features otherwise people may get confused) then the main body of the page is the blue, as in the mockup.  I used the same logo and the font for the header is this Google font: https://fonts.google.com/?query=rampart+one&preview.text=STAR%20Speech%20and%20Language%20Therapy&preview.text_type=custom.  Other headers on the page use this font: https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Annie+Use+Your+Telescope?query=annie&preview.text=STAR%20Speech%20and%20Language%20Therapy&preview.text_type=custom.  I added in a thick dashed border under the header.  The intro text is just some text I’ve taken from one of the Seeing Speech pages, and the images are still currently just the ones in the mockup.  Hovering over an image causes the same dashed border to appear.  The footer is a kind of pink colour, which is supposed to suggest those blue and pink rubbers you used to get in schools.

The second version uses the ‘rampart one’ font just for ‘STAR’ in the header, with the other font used for the rest of the text.  The menu bar is moved to underneath the header and the dashed line is gone.  The main body of the page is white rather than continuing the blue of the header and ‘rampart one’ is used as the in-page headers.  The images now have rounded edges, as do the text blocks in the images.  Hovering over an image brings up a red border, the same shade as used in the active menu item.  The pink footer has been replaced with the blue from the navbar.  Both versions are ‘responsive’ and work on all screen sizes.

I’ll be continuing to work on the mockups next week.