Week Beginning 9th April 2018

I returned to work after my Easter holiday on Tuesday this week, making it another four-day week for me.  On Tuesday I spent some time going through my emails and dealing with some issues that had arisen whilst I’d been away.  This included sorting out why plain text versions of the texts in the Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing were giving 403 errors (it turned out the server was set up to not allow plain text files to be accessed and an email to Chris got this sorted).  I also spent some time going through the Mapping Metaphor data for Wendy.  She wanted me to structure the data to allow her to easily see which metaphors continued from Old English times and I wrote a script that gave a nice colour-coded output to show those that continued or didn’t.  I also created another script that lists the number (and the details of) metaphors that begin in each 50-year period across the full range.  In addition, I spoke to Gavin Miller about an estimate of my time for a potential follow-on project he’s putting together.

The rest of my week was split between two projects:  LinguisticDNA and REELS.  For LinguisticDNA I continued to work on the search facilities for the semantically tagged EEBO dataset.  Chris gave me a test server on Tuesday (just an old desktop PC to add to the several others I now have in my office) and I managed to get the database and the scripts I’d started working on before Easter transferred onto it.  With everything set up I continued to add new features to the search facility.  I completed the second search option (Choose a Thematic Heading and a specific book to view the most frequent words) which allowa you to specify a Thematic Heading, a book, a maximum number of returned words and whether the theme selection includes lower levels.  I also made it so that you can miss out the selection of a thematic heading to bring back all of the words in the specified book listed by frequency.  If you do this each word’s thematic heading is also listed in the output, and it’s a useful way of figuring out which thematic headings you might want to focus on.

I also added a new option to both searches 1 and 2 that allows you to amalgamate the different noun and verb types.  There are several different types (e.g. NN1 and NN2 for singular and plural forms of nouns) and it’s useful to join these together as single frequency counts  rather than having them listed separately.

I also completed search option 3 (Choose a specific book to view the most frequent Thematic Headings).  This allows the user to select a book from an autocomplete list and optionally provide a limit to the returned headings.  The results display the thematic headings found in the book listed in order of frequency.  The returned headings are displayed as links that perform a ‘search 2’ for the heading in the book, allowing you to more easily ‘drill down’ into the data.  For all results I have added in a count column, so you can easily see how many results are returned or reference a specific result, and I also added titles to the search results pages that tell you exactly what it is you’ve searched for.  I also created a list of all thematic headings, as I thought it might be handy to be able to see what’s what.  When looking at this list you can perform a ‘search 1’ for any of the headings by clicking on one, and similarly, I created an option to list all of the books that form the dataset.  This list displays each book’s ID, author, title, terms and number of pages, and you can perform a ‘search 3’ for a book by clicking on its ID.

On Friday I participated in the Linguistic DNA project conference call, following which I wrote a document describing the EEBO search facilities, as project members outside of Glasgow can’t currently access the site I’ve put together.

For REELS I continued to work on the public interface for the place-name data, which included the following:

  1. The number of returned place-names is now displayed in the ‘you searched for…’ box
  2. The textual list of results now features two buttons for each result, one to view the record and one to view the place-name on the map.  I’m hoping the latter might be quite useful as I often find an interesting name in the textual list and wonder which dot on the map it actually corresponds to.  Now with one click I can find it.
  3. Place-name labels on the map now appear when you zoom in past a certain level (currently set to zoom level 12).  Note that only results rather than grey spots get the visible labels as otherwise there’s too much clutter and the map takes ages to load too.
  4. The record page now features a map with the place-name at the centre, and all other place-names as grey dots.  The marker label is automatically visible.
  5. Returning back to the search results from a record when you’ve done a quick search now works – previously this was broken.
  6. The map zoom controls have been moved to the bottom right, and underneath them is a new icon for making the map ‘full screen’.  Pressing on this will make the map take up the whole of your screen.  Press ‘Esc’ or on the icon again to return to the regular view.  Note that this feature requires a modern web browser, although I’ve just tested in in IE on Windows 10 and it works.  Using full screen mode makes working with the map much more pleasant.  Note, however, that navigating away form the map (e.g. if you click a ‘view record’ button) will return you to the regular view.
  7. There is a new ‘menu’ icon in the top-left of the map.  Press on this and a menu slides out from the left.  This presents you with options to change how the results are categorised on the map.  In addition to the ‘by classification code’ option that has always been there, you can now categorise and colour code the markers by start date, altitude and element language.  As with code, you can turn on and off particular levels using the legend in the top right. E.g. if you only want to display markers that have an altitude of 300m or more.