Week Beginning 14th August 2017

I was on holiday last week but was back to work on Monday this week.  I’d kept tabs on my emails whilst I was away but as usual there were a number of issues that had cropped up in my absence that I needed to sort out.  I spent some time on Monday going through emails and updating my ‘to do’ list and generally getting back up to speed again after a lazy week off.

I had rather a lot of meetings and other such things to prepare for and attend this week.  On Monday I met with Bryony Randall for a final ‘sign off’ meeting for the New Modernist Editing project.  I’ve really enjoyed working on this project, both the creation of the digital edition and taking part in the project workshop.  We have now moved the digital edition of Virginia Woolf’s short story ‘Ode written partly in prose on seeing the name of Cutbush above a butcher’s shop in Pentonville’ to what will hopefully be its final and official URL and you can now access it here: http://nme-digital-ode.glasgow.ac.uk

On Tuesday I was on the interview panel for Jane Stuart-Smith’s SPADE project, which I’m also working on for a small percentage of my time.  After the interviews I also had a further meeting with Jane to discuss some of the technical aspects of her project.  On Wednesday I met with Alison Wiggins to discuss her ‘Archives and Writing Lives’ project, which is due to begin next month.  This project will involve creating digital editions of several account books from the 16th century.  When we were putting the bid together I did quite a bit of work creating a possible TEI schema for the account books and working out how best to represent all of the various data contained within the account entries.  Although this approach would work perfectly well, now that Alison has started transcribing some entries herself we’ve realised that managing complex relational structures via taxonomies in TEI via the Oxygen editor is a bit of a cumbersome process.  Instead Alison herself investigated using a relational database structure and had created her own Access database.  We went through the structure when we met and everything seems to be pretty nicely organised.  It should be possible to record all of the types of data and the relationships between these types using the Access database and so we’ve decided that Alison should just continue to use this for her project.  I did suggest making a MySQL database and creating a PHP based content management system for the project, but as there’s only one member of staff doing the work and Alison is very happy using Access it seemed to make sense to just stick with this approach.  Later on in the project I will then extract the data from Access, create a MySQL database out of it and develop a nice website for searching, browsing and visualising the data.  I will also write a script to migrate the data to our original TEI XML structure as this might prove useful in other projects.

It’s Performance and Development Review time again, and I have my meeting with my line manager coming up, so I spent about a day this week reviewing last year’s objectives and writing all of the required sections for this year.  Thankfully having my weekly blog posts makes it easier to figure out exactly what I’ve been up to in the review period.

Other than these tasks I helped Jane Roberts out with an issue with the Thesaurus of Old English, I fixed an issue with the STARN website that Jean Anderson had alerted me to, I had an email conversation with Rhona Brown about her Edinburgh Gazetteer project and I discussed data management issues with Stuart Gillespie.  I also uploaded the final set of metaphor data to the Mapping Metaphor database.  That’s all of the data processing for this project now completed, which is absolutely brilliant.  All categories are now complete and the number of metaphors has gone down from 12938 to 11883, while the number of sample lexemes (including first lexemes) has gone up from 25129 to a whopping 45108.

Other than the above I attended the ‘Future proof IT’ event on Friday.  This was an all-day event organised by the University’s IT services and included speakers from JISC, Microsoft, Cisco and various IT related people across the University.  It was an interesting day with some excellent speakers, although the talks weren’t as relevant to my role as I’d hoped they would be.  I did get to see Microsoft’s HoloLens technology in action, which was great, although I didn’t personally get a chance to try the headset on, which was a little disappointing.